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Visual Field Deficits - Illustrations

Gordon N Dutton, Vision and the Brain, AFB Press, 2015 The image the person above is looking at is represented by a clock, with each quarter (quadrant) shaded, to show how it relates to the sections in the occipital lobes.Gordon N Dutton, Vision and the Brain, AFB Press, 2015 The image the person above is looking at is represented by a clock, with each quarter (quadrant) shaded, to show how it relates to the sections in the occipital lobes.

The image the person above is looking at is represented by a clock, with each quarter (quadrant) shaded, to show how it relates to the sections in the occipital lobes.

The image you see is split into quadrants, and each is created by the diametrically opposite quadrant in your occipital lobes.

Thus damage to the upper left occipital lobe, for example, will be responsible for lower right visual field loss.

The images below illustrate how the above visual field impairments affect how we see:

Thus it is important to understand the whole visual field.

Areas with fewer visual responses should not be ignored, other techniques and strategies can be developed to make use of this vision.

Moving on from the occipital lobes, the image travels to the posterior parietal lobes. Here two different types of impaired vision similar to visual field impairment can occur, in any part of the visual field:

1) Visual Inattention
2) Visual Neglect

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At CVI Scotland we are devoted to helping people understand cerebral visual impairments, and together working towards developing the understanding of this complex condition.