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Lessons

1d - Middle Temporal Lobes

Posted by Helen St Clair Tracy in Level 1 - The Brain
Published: 04/03/2019, 12:57am | Updated: 13/03/2019, 11:13am

Video Link: https://vimeo.com/322260822

Diagram showing left side of the brain with three areas of the temporal lobe (coloured green) indicated with red lines and text.Diagram showing left side of the brain with three areas of the temporal lobe (coloured green) indicated with red lines and text.

The left temporal lobe is coloured green on this diagram.

The temporal lobes are split into three areas:

  • Superior Temporal Gyrus
  • Middle Temporal Gyrus
  • Inferior Temporal Gyrus

Near the point where the occipital lobes meet the middle temporal gyrus, is an area called MT, which stands for middle temporal, and is also sometimes called V5.

Diagram showing left side of the brain with the location of the area MTV5 indicated with a blue cross and arrow.Diagram showing left side of the brain with the location of the area MTV5 indicated with a blue cross and arrow.

MT is the name of the part of the brain responsible for adding movement to the mental image created by the occipital lobes.

Going back to our production line...

In the last lesson, our image travelled from the occipital lobes to the posterior parietal lobes.

The same image, at the same time, so simultaneously, travels to the temporal lobes, and the first port of call is MT, right at the junction of the occipital and temporal lobes, where movement is added, as it is experienced, in real-time.

Checklist

Before you move on to the next lesson, please check:

  • You understand the difference between the area MT (middle temporal) and the middle temporal gyrus.
  • You understand that movement is processed and added to the image in MT.

Next lesson: Level 1e The Brain - Temporal Lobes

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