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Brain Locations

The key areas of the visual brain are explained in our Lessons Level 1

Visual disorders linked to specific brain locations, as identified by MRI imaging.

Not everyone with the visual impairments listed below will have identifiable damage to the region in the brain.

Some people with damage in these regions will not have the visual impairments detailed.

This is just a guide, as we think, if there is known damage in certain parts of the brain, it is worth checking to see if there is evidence of the possible related visual difficulties.

On this page we are listing only the brain related impairments of vision, which you will find listed on the CVIs page, with a brief explanation and many links to learn more.

The visual disorders are often accompanied by other difficulties, for example affecting the strength on one side of the body, how sound is processed, ability to concentrate and language.

Brain Images

Diagram showing two views of the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes.  The top row is looking from behind, called a posterior view.  The bottom row is looking at the right side of the brain, called a lateral view.Diagram showing two views of the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes. The top row is looking from behind, called a posterior view. The bottom row is looking at the right side of the brain, called a lateral view.

To help explain, we have included images of the brain showing possible affected areas.

  • Posterior means back. The posterior view of the brain is looking from the back, like if you were standing behind someone and facing the back of their head. The posterior parietal lobes are the area behind the parietal lobes, where they meet the occipital lobes.
  • A lateral view is from the side.

Left Occipital Lobe

Left occipital lobe. Posterior view of the brain, with the occipital lobes coloured dark red, and the left occipital lobe marked with a white ring.Left occipital lobe. Posterior view of the brain, with the occipital lobes coloured dark red, and the left occipital lobe marked with a white ring.

  • Hemianopia (Right Sided) possibly with Blindsight

Right Occipital Lobe

Right occipital lobe. Posterior view of the brain, with the occipital lobes coloured dark red, and the right occipital lobe marked with a white ring. Right occipital lobe. Posterior view of the brain, with the occipital lobes coloured dark red, and the right occipital lobe marked with a white ring.

  • Hemianopia (Left Sided), possibly with Blindsight

Both Occipital Lobes

Both Occipital Lobes. Posterior view of the brain, with the occipital lobes coloured dark red.Both Occipital Lobes. Posterior view of the brain, with the occipital lobes coloured dark red.

  • Reduced Visual Acuity
  • Reduced Contrast Sensitivity
  • Visual Field Constriction
  • Double hemianopia causing complete occipital cortical blindness when most severe
  • Blindsight

Left Posterior Parietal Lobe

Left posterior parietal lobe.  Posterior view of the brain, with the parietal lobes coloured dark red, and the posterior (back of) the left parietal lobe marked with a white circle.Left posterior parietal lobe. Posterior view of the brain, with the parietal lobes coloured dark red, and the posterior (back of) the left parietal lobe marked with a white circle.

  • Hemi Inattention (right sided) which tends to be mild
  • Optic Ataxia (particularly affecting the right side)
  • Lower Visual Field Impairment affecting right lower quadrant

Right Posterior Parietal Lobe

Right posterior parietal lobe.  Posterior view of the brain, with the parietal lobes coloured dark red, and the posterior (back of) the right parietal lobe marked with a white circle.  Right posterior parietal lobe. Posterior view of the brain, with the parietal lobes coloured dark red, and the posterior (back of) the right parietal lobe marked with a white circle.

  • Hemi Inattention, on both sides, worse on the left side, which tends to be severe.
  • Lower Visual Field Impairment affecting left lower quadrant

Both Posterior Parietal Lobes - Severe Damage

Severe damage on both sides to either cortex (outer layer of grey matter) and / or white matter. Grey and white matter explained in Lesson 1a.

Both posterior parietal lobes.  Posterior view of the brain, with the parietal lobes coloured dark red, and the posterior (back of) the both the parietal lobe marked with a white circle.  Both posterior parietal lobes. Posterior view of the brain, with the parietal lobes coloured dark red, and the posterior (back of) the both the parietal lobe marked with a white circle.

  • Simultanagnostic Vision
  • Optic Ataxia
  • Dyskinetopsia
  • Lower Visual Field Impairment on both sides (bilateral)

Parietal Lobes

White Matter Damage

Parietal lobes. Posterior view of the brain, with the parietal lobes coloured dark red.Parietal lobes. Posterior view of the brain, with the parietal lobes coloured dark red.

  • Simultanagnostic Vision
  • Optic Ataxia
  • Dyskinetopsia
  • Lower Visual Field Impairment on both sides (bilateral)

Left Temporal Lobe

Left temporal lobe.  Posterior view of the brain, with the temporal lobes coloured dark red, and the left temporal lobe marked with a white ring.Left temporal lobe. Posterior view of the brain, with the temporal lobes coloured dark red, and the left temporal lobe marked with a white ring.

  • Shape & Object Agnosia
  • Alexia
  • Right upper quadrant visual field loss

Right Temporal Lobe

Right temporal lobe.  Posterior view of the brain, with the temporal lobes coloured dark red, and the right temporal lobe marked with a white ring.Right temporal lobe. Posterior view of the brain, with the temporal lobes coloured dark red, and the right temporal lobe marked with a white ring.

  • Prosopagnosia
  • Topographic Agnosia
  • Left upper quadrant visual field loss

Both Temporal Lobes

Temporal lobes.  Posterior view of the brain, with the temporal lobes coloured dark red.Temporal lobes. Posterior view of the brain, with the temporal lobes coloured dark red.

  • Shape & Object Agnosia
  • Alexia
  • Prosopagnosia
  • Topographic Agnosia

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At CVI Scotland we are devoted to helping people understand cerebral visual impairments, and together working towards developing the understanding of this complex condition.