CVI Mascot - VIC

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Lessons

Hi,

We are delighted to launch the first of a series of lessons to help explain CVI.

Each lesson is short and has been carefully constructed to teach this complex subject both effectively and enjoyably.

Each lesson starts with a short film, presented by our advisor Professor Gordon Dutton. The films also have slides, which may appear to need changing more frequently than they do...there's a reason for this. We live in a very fast paced world, with information available in split seconds at our fingertips, but there is a difference between simply processing something, and actually learning. When you are watching the films, and see a slide, most will identify what they are looking at in a split second. The rest of the time the slide is on your screen your visual brain is redundant. We are saying to the 40% of your brain dedicated to visual processing 'thank you very much, you take a break for a moment, because we want to use as much of your focus as possible to do something other than look...we want you to concentrate on LISTENING'.

Think you can look and listen at the same time?

Try turning on a news station, on the radio, and combine listening to the news and reading a book together. If you watch television later, for a moment, consider what happens when you shut your eyes and just listen - all the sounds intensify and become much clearer.

So this is why the slides are on the screen for longer than you may be used to in your super-fast technological world - because we need you to slow down and really listen. The second level of these lessons is all about how the brain learns, and we have tried to incorporate much of our understanding into the design and structure of these lessons. To make them meaningful, enjoyable, understandable, accessible, and ultimately learnable.

Why?

The world of CVI sometimes seems a bit muddled, and there is a lot of confusion around how a very complex pre-term baby can have anything in common with a stroke survivor or a teenager with autism. So people treat all the different groups separately, and we want to explain the underlying conditions that many will have in common, yet manifest so completely differently.

In trying to explain, we ask WHY? a lot. Each person with CVI is a puzzle, a complicated puzzle, but we believe with the right understanding, a solvable puzzle. To be understood requires an understanding of which individual CVIs the person is affected by. We are going to try to show you how, to make these lessons relevant to the person you support, or maybe you, if you are affected by CVI.

We are very lucky that many people dedicated many hundreds of hours of their time to create these lessons. CVI Scotland is passionate about making all the resources free, currently to an incredible 135 countries. We can only do this thanks to the incredible generosity of the people who dedicate so much of their time and expertise. The whole CVI Scotland team are volunteers, but we do have inevitable running and production costs. These lessons were funded thanks to a grant from the RSMacDonald Trust and a very generous donation from the company 'Walk The Camino'. If you or your organisation use our resources and are able to make a donation, we would greatly appreciate it.

We hope you find the lessons insightful, they have been designed to be followed in order, even though some of the early ones may seem very simple, including explaining how to pronounce certain terms. We think by the time you get into to Level 2 you'll be hooked.

Best wishes

The CVI Scotland Team

In this issue..

  • Lessons
  • Donations

Lessons

The first three levels of lessons, designed to be followed in order.

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About Us

At CVI Scotland we are devoted to helping people understand cerebral visual impairments, and together working towards developing the understanding of this complex condition.